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SURVEY FINDS MAJORITY OF KENTUCKIANS SUPPORT STATE-FUNDED CONSERVATION EFFORTS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 10, 2011

Lexington, KY.–A recent survey of Kentucky voters revealed that they enthusiastically support a number of proposals to increase the State’s investment in conservation of Kentucky’s resources.

      The study, conducted earlier this year by the bipartisan research team of Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates (Dem.) and Public Opinion Strategies (Rep.), asked voters a variety of questions as they relate to conservation of land, water and wildlife in Kentucky.  Key findings of the survey include:

  1. Eighty-six percent of voters support maintaining and/or increasing state government funding for programs to protect land, water and wildlife.
  2. Sixty-six percent of voters support dedicating additional public funding for land, water and wildlife conservation in Kentucky.
  3. Seventy-four percent of voters believe we can have a clean environment and strong economy at the same time without having to choose on over the other.

“The survey results indicate that Kentuckians desire and would support additional effort to invest in Kentucky’s clean water and natural beauty,” said Terry Cook, State Director for The Nature Conservancy.  “By investing in these conservation efforts, we not only protect Kentucky’s land and water for future generations, but we invest in the natural infrastructure that is a key component of a healthy and vibrant economy.  A healthy environment attracts business, enhances our quality of life and supports sustainable tourism economies which benefit rural communities.”

     Kentucky’s state-funded conservation efforts are significantly less than surrounding states.   According to the Trust for Public Land Conservation Almanac – a non-partisan non-profit that tracks conservation funding policy in the United States – Kentucky invested approximately $46 million in land conservation during the span of 1998-2008, or $11 per capita.  States such as North Carolina, Virginia, South Carolina and Tennessee spent between $123 million and $1.08 billion or between $20 and $120 per capita during the same time period.

     The telephone survey was commissioned by The Nature Conservancy and The Trust for Public Land with support from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Kentucky Conservation Committee.

 

About The Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy is a leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.  The Conservancy and its more than 1 million members have protected nearly 120 million acres worldwide.  To learn more about the Conservancy’s work in Kentucky visit The Nature Conservancy on the web at www.nature.org/kentucky .

MEDIA CONTACT:  Phil Osborne, Preston-Osborne, 859.231.7711 ext.227, posborne@preston-osborne.com

                                                

Help the USDA Locate the Emerald Ash Borer

America’s neighborhoods and forests are under attack. The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) beetle has destroyed tens of millions of ash trees. Help the USDA protect our trees — and stop the beetle. Look for signs of the EAB in your community and report both positive and negative findings at BeetleDetectives.com on behalf of your organization. Then watch your organization rise through the ranks of top beetle detectives.

Identifying the Emerald Ash Borer Beetle (EAB)

From May to August, adult EAB emerge from under the bark of ash
trees and mate. Females lay their eggs in bark crevices and the eggs
hatch into wormlike larvae. The larvae tunnel under the bark to feed
and grow throughout the fall and winter. It is this tunneling and feeding
that eventually kills the tree. You should capture the insects you think
are EAB, place them in a jar and freeze them — this will preserve
the insect for easy identification. You can also search for signs of
infestation.

• Bright, metallic green

• 1/2” long, flattened back

• Purple abdominal segments beneath wing cover

New National Management Plan Template improves woodland owner access to cost-share and technical services

ATFS is very pleased to announce the availability of the new national management plan template in partnership with the US Forest Service (USFS) and the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). The three organizations recognized that having three separate management plan requirements for ATFS certification, NRCS financial assistance funds and Forest Service Stewardship program funds inhibited participation by forest owners in these programs. We worked together to develop a national model management plan template that can be used for any of the three programs. This collaborative decision will help minimize costs and redundant processes. The template includes a guide for both landowners and foresters in using this new tool.

The new management plan template was developed to help landowners be more engaged in the plan writing process. We have heard from many landowners and foresters across the country that some management plans are not used by landowners because they do not understand what is in the plan or they find it intimidating because they had no hand in drafting the plan. In the template guides we developed for foresters and landowners, we encourage landowners to seek out the assistance of a professional. We hope that the template format will help you reach more landowners by cultivating more informed and engaged landowners.

Please visit www.treefarmsystem.org/Nationalplantemplate for a copy.

As the program rolls out the plan will streamline access for folks in the system to apply for cost-share dollars for their conservation work.

Local, state and federal government efforts to rein in spending has meant the disappearance of hundreds of forester positions. Combined with the very limited number of forester TSPs, woodland owners have been left with fewer options to get conservation plans and technical assistance for cost-share dollars. The MOU allows additional training for Tree Farm Inspectors to attain TSP status.

KWOA and KWOF IRS Form 990

KWOA and KWOF filed forms 990 with the IRS for 2009. The forms, for tax-exempt organizations, were accepted by the IRS on 5/12/2010. A pdf (electronic file) of the completed forms is available by contacting KWOA via email: info@kwoa.net;  a paper copy may be obtained by calling 606-876-3423

Web Site Terms of Use and Disclaimer

All information offered by KWOA to whomsoever, whether written or oral, is intended for the sole, express purpose of assisting woodland owners attain the best long-range dollar return from their forestry operation, while at the same time maintaining a healthy, beautiful forest. KWOA is not engaged in rendering legal, tax, accounting or other professional service. No one should undertake any suggestion offered by KWOA without first consulting experienced professional advisors.
KWOA does not endorse and is not responsible for any statement, opinion, or advice given or made by anyone other than authorized KWOA representatives. All postings are those of the authors and you rely on such information at your own risk.

Maryland’s Forest Conservation Act

UPDATE

The Chesapeake Bay Journal – Seven Valleys,PA,USA, February 2009

 

Maryland‘s Forest Conservation Act has become the impetus for a forest mitigation market in Maryland. Developers who cannot mitigate their deforestation on-site are required to mitigate off-site through landowner afforestation/reforestation credits or by paying in-lieu fees that will eventually result in this.

 

www.bayjournal.com/article.cfm?article=3522