Category Archives: News

News about Kentucky Woodlands and their owners

2019 Ohio River Valley Woodland & Wildlife Workshop – March 30th

 

Make plans to attend the Ohio River Valley Woodland & Wildlife Workshop on Saturday, March 30, 2019.

This one-day workshop will be held at Clifty Falls State Park between Louisville and Cincinnati in Madison, Indiana. It is directly across the river from northern Kentucky (Trimble County). Lodging is available at the park.

Forestry and wildlife experts from Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio will address the questions and concerns woodland owners have regarding the management of their properties.

Tune in to weekly radio broadcast for woodland owners

From the Woods Kentucky is a weekly radio show broadcast by the University of Kentucky Department of Forestry and Natural Resources on WRFL 88.1 FM Lexington. The show airs spring semester 2019 on Mondays from 11 am until noon on 88.1 FM in Lexington.

Recordings of From the Woods Kentucky are archived for listening at your convenience. Prior topics include firewood, woodlands owners, deer, watersheds, citizen science and many more.

UK Forestry and Natural Resources Extension Receives National Award

Dec. 18, 2018 – Lexington, KY (University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment)

The University of Kentucky Forestry and Natural Resources Cooperative Extension team recently won the Comprehensive Family Forests Education Award presented by the National Woodland Owners Association and the National Association of University Forest Resources Programs.

This is the second time the team has won this national award, which is presented to an educational institution that has delivered the most effective education program benefiting family forest owners over the past five years.

University of Kentucky Forestry and Natural Resources Cooperative Extension team recently won the Comprehensive Family Forests Education Award. Photo credit: Laura Lhotka, UK Forestry

A family forest education program is a combination of educational materials, media, courses, workshops, events and/or electronic media, including applied research that supports those efforts. The award recognizes effective programs that address any or all aspects of forest resources management including silviculture, forest health, harvesting, forest and estate planning, business management and marketing.

 

Jeff Stringer, chair of the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, accepted the award on the team’s behalf.

“Forests comprise 50 percent of Kentucky, and 78 percent of the 12 million acres of forest is family owned. It is vital that these family forest owners are provided with information and education to help them make wise decisions to enhance the forest for their benefit and ultimately for the benefit of all Kentuckians,” he said. “I am proud of the tireless work conducted by extension professionals in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. This national award highlights the quality and effectiveness of their program.”

Information about the programs and resources UK Cooperative Extension offers for Kentucky woodland owners is available online at forestry.ca.uky.edu/extension-home.

Kentucky Leopold Conservation Award Seeks Nominees

January 2, 2019

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Steve Coleman, colemansteve51@gmail.com, 502.330.5044

Casey Langan, clangan@sandcountyfoundation.org, 608.663.4605 ext. 32

FRANKFORT, KY. — Know a Kentucky farmer or forester who goes above and beyond in the care and management of natural resources? Nominate them for the 2019 Kentucky Leopold Conservation Award®.

Sand County Foundation, the nation’s leading voice for conservation of private land, presents the Leopold Conservation Award to private landowners in 14 states for extraordinary achievement in voluntary conservation. In Kentucky, the $10,000 award is presented with the Kentucky Agricultural Council and the Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts.

Given in honor of renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold, the award recognizes landowners who inspire others with their dedication to land, water and wildlife habitat management on private, working land. In his influential 1949 book, “A Sand County Almanac,” Leopold called for an ethical relationship between people and the land they own and manage.

Nominations may be submitted on behalf of a landowner, or landowners may nominate themselves. The application can be found at: https://sandcountyfoundation.org/uploads/Kentucky-CFN-2019.pdf

The application deadline date is April 1, 2019. The committee prefers application materials to be sent electronically. To do so, please e-mail materials to colemansteve51@gmail.com.

Materials may be mailed to:

Leopold Conservation Award

c/o Franklin County Conservation District

103 Lakeview Court, Frankfort, KY 40601

The 2018 recipient of the award was Trunnell Family Farm from Utica.

The Kentucky Leopold Conservation Award is made possible thanks to the generous support and partnership of Kentucky Agricultural Council, Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts, Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, Kentucky Corn Growers Association, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Kentucky Woodland Owner’s Association, Kentucky Tree Farm Committee, Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association, AgriBusiness Association of Kentucky, Kentucky Pork Producers, The Nature Conservancy in Kentucky, and the U.S Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

For more information on the award, visit www.leopoldconservationaward.org

ABOUT THE LEOPOLD CONSERVATION AWARD

The Leopold Conservation Award is a competitive award that recognizes landowner achievement in voluntary conservation. The award consists of $10,000 and a crystal depicting Aldo Leopold. Sand County Foundation presents Leopold Conservation Awards in California, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

 

ABOUT SAND COUNTY FOUNDATION

Sand County Foundation inspires and enables a growing number of private landowners to ethically manage natural resources in their care, so future generations have clean and abundant water, healthy soil to support agriculture and forestry, plentiful habitat for wildlife and opportunities for outdoor recreation.

 

KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL

The Kentucky Agricultural Council is a 501(c)(3) organization consisting of some 80 agricultural organizations representing all sectors of Kentucky agriculture. The membership is composed of commodity groups, state and federal agricultural organizations, agricultural trade organizations and the state’s institutions of higher education that serve Kentucky agriculture. The KAC functions as an umbrella group and hub for its members, disseminating information and promoting coordination among all agricultural organizations and sectors. Since 2006, the KAC also has served as the “steward of strategic planning” for the future of Kentucky agriculture and Kentucky’s rural communities. www.kyagcouncil.net.

 

KENTUCKY ASSOCIATION OF CONSERVATION DISTRICTS

The Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts is 501(c)(3) organization consisting of Kentucky’s local conservation districts and watershed conservancy districts. KACD encourages the exchange of information relating to the administration and operation of conservation districts and watershed conservancy districts; to affect cooperation between districts and agencies and organizations concerned with any and all phases of soil and water conservation; to promote the welfare of conservation districts and watershed conservancy districts and the people therein; and to maintain strong and active membership in both KACD and the National Association of Conservation Districts.

California fires spark debate over forest management

Can most of the blame for California’s devastating wildfires be attributed to the state’s forest management? Fire scientists recognize a larger effect from climate change in promoting abnormally dry conditions and dead trees. The first nine months of 2018 have been the fourth-warmest on record for California. This past summer was the second-hottest on record in the state. An additional factor is the encroachment of urban development on wildlands.

Most of California’s forests are under federal or private control. US agriculture and interior secretaries Perdue and Zinke are pressing for farm bill authorizations in the current House version of the bill (Forestry Title of H.R. 2) which includes amendments mandating a controversial expansion of “categorical exclusions,” which allow land managers to fast track forest management projects and largely bypass environmental review. Read the transcript for a National Public Radio interview with Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, who oversees the U.S. Forest Service.

Leading experts in forest ecology management think the Forest Title in the House version of the Farm Bill  does not properly address science-based prevention programs such as controlled burning and fuel reduction in wildland urban interface areas as well as the critical role of climate change. Instead it focuses on accelerated commercial logging and road building which generally exacerbate fire risk. The House bill’s forestry provisions also expand post-fire “salvage” logging which they contend contributes to ecological recovery in the disturbed area. New “categorical exclusions” limit input from state wildlife agencies among others. Read more 

Greg Aplet, science director for the Wilderness Society in Denver, takes the view of many wildfire behavior scientists: If the goal is to protect communities and lives from fire, the emphasis first needs to be on clearing out those dried out fine fuels, the understory, from the forest floor, not the green live trees. “The Forest Service often lacks the personnel and the resources to do the types of landscape-scale restoration work that needs to be done,” says Nick Smith, executive director of Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities, a non-profit forestry group. Read more

According to Dr. Chad Hanson, director and principal ecologist for the California-based John Muir Project, logging, including many projects deceptively promoted as forest “thinning,” removes fire-resistant trees, reduces the cooling shade of the forest canopy and leaves behind highly combustible twigs and branches. Read more:… The California fires took place in some of the most heavily logged areas of the Sierra Nevada range.

A study by Hanson and others of whether increased forest protection corresponds to higher severity in frequent-fire forests of the western US found that forests with higher levels of protection had lower severity values even though they are generally identified as having the highest overall levels of biomass and fuel loading. Some of these researchers have hypothesized that as forests mature, the overstory canopy results in cooling shade that allows surface fuels to stay moister longer into fire season. This effect may also lead to a reduction in pyrogenic native shrubs and other understory vegetation that can carry fire, due to insufficient sunlight reaching the understory.

In general, their findings—that forests with the highest levels of protection from logging tend to burn least severely—suggest a need for managers and policymakers to rethink current forest and fire management direction, particularly proposals that seek to weaken forest protections or suspend environmental laws ostensibly to facilitate a more extensive and industrial forest–fire management regime.

Nominate Your Service Forester for KWOA Recognition

We are looking for nominations from KWOA Members for your Outstanding KDF Service Forester

Kentucky Woodland Owners Association will recognize a KDF Service Forester for his/her outstanding achievements. Nominations may be made by any KWOA member and are due no later than February 13, 2019.

Purpose:

To recognize outstanding accomplishments of KDF Service Foresters employed with the Kentucky Division of Forestry. The applicant should have not received this award for the past three years. Nominations may be submitted by any KWOA Member.

 

Suggested format and guidelines for nominations:

  1. Entries may be typed or handwritten. Limit the award entry to 2 pages, one side only, plus 1-2 pages, one side only, of supportive information, i.e., letter(s) of support, news articles, pictures, etc. Additional pages beyond this description will not be considered. The nomination may be submitted in an electronically word file prepared format if desired.
  2. Consideration for the service award will be the demonstrated overall professionalism, the volume of work, the relationship with the woodland owner, the responsiveness to request and the sustained excellence over a period of time.
  3. Include in the application:
    • Full name, current address and title plus email address of nominee
    • Name, contact information of the one preparing the nomination
  4. Other considerations, if available. Work history, achievements that particularly relate to success

in working with Kentucky Woodland Owners: who benefited and what were the impacts. Additional contributions made to forestry including work on committees, task forces, and leadership positions.

  1. Summary Statements of Support: Concise, well-written, easy-to-read narrative summary statement (50-75 words).
  2. TIME PERIOD: Entries are due by February 13, 2019. Although forestry programs require more than one year completing, the major accomplishments being considered should have been realized during the past three years.
  3. Submit applications by February 13 to Karen Marshall, KWOA editor: editor@kwoa.net or mail hardcopy to KWOA at PO Box 694, Maysville KY 41056.

 

Kentucky Division of Forestry Service Foresters are the first line of support for Kentucky woodland owners who have a desire and need to manage their woodlands. 160,000+ woodland owners have 10 acres or more located throughout the state. The service forester’s workload is demanding and important to woodland owners.

KDF will review the top three applications for accuracy and notify the KWOA awards committee for the selection. This recognition will not automatically be awarded each year if applicants do not meet KWOA selection standards.

The winning recipient and a guest will be invited to the KWOA annual meeting where the recognition and a plaque will be presented.

Previous award recipients were: James Morris (2010), Steve Gray (2011), Kevin Galloway (2012), Robert Bean (2013), Michael C.Froelich (2014), Lisa Armstrong (2015), William Knott (2016), Josh Frazier (2017) and Floyd Willis (2018).

Donate Items for the 2019 Annual Meeting Silent Auction

Start your spring cleaning early! Look for an item you would like to donate to the annual meeting silent auction. Donations can be anything with a monetary value. Examples:  sporting event tickets, gift baskets, gift cards, handmade items such as scarves, blankets and wooden items such as toys, bowls, spoons, etc.

Email a description of your item and a suggested minimum bid to Harry Pelle, board member, at hpelle@windstream.net. Please put Silent Auction in the subject line of your email.

New Kentucky Logging BMP Field Guide

The September 2018 field guide to the minimum requirements for logging Best Management Practices in Kentucky (FOR-130) is now available from the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

The practices are designed specifically for logging operations to use before, during and after timber harvesting. If implemented correctly they will reduce or eliminate water pollutants that have the potential to be generated from logging operations where drainage channels and water bodies are present. The guide contains recommendations that can be used to effectively and efficiently implement the minimum requirements.