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News about Kentucky Woodlands and their owners

KWOA members selected for Outstanding Forest Stewards Award

Jerry and Portia Brown have been awarded the central regional and the state Division of Forestry awards as the 2017 Outstanding Forest Stewards. The award will be presented to them at the awards luncheon October 20 during the 41st annual Kentucky Governor’s Conference on Energy and the Environment in Lexington. The conference’s two days of discussion and debate will examine the top issues involving Kentucky’s energy future and its environment.

Portia and Jerry Brown pose for a photo at a field day
Photo by Henry Duncan

“Over the years we have learned so much, met many wonderful people who share our interest in sustaining the natural resources that bless us all, and tried to share our time, talents and resources to conserve these invaluable resources and promote sustainable practices.”

The selection committee chose the Browns for having “… left a beneficial, everlasting mark on the natural resources of our great Commonwealth.” The award reflects work done at both farms. Grayson Woods, the Grayson County Tree Farm that Portia’s mother started a little before 1950 to curb severely eroded land reflects successful and natural transition from a pine plantations to native hardwood. The last pines were harvested in 2014 with the help of ACA consultant, Chris Will. Jerry & Chris laid out road access to the site prior to opening the bidding process. This served a dual purpose:

> preparing the site with respect to BMP practices for logging

> allowing bidders to better see what trees were to be harvested and any areas of concern relating to the actual harvest process.

 

The Shelby Property contributes an educational center and reflects post-harvest regeneration. The Browns purchased this land in 1996. The majority of the land was clear cut around 1975 for transition to grazing / silage crops. An area of roughly 35 acres, that the Browns like to call “The Back Forty”, appears to have been high-graded about 75 years ago.Their first project was re-aligning access roads to prevent erosion and improve the quality of access. They used a number of techniques for crop tree release and invasive species control in order to nurture the regeneration of native hardwood species. They also use several techniques to provide wildlife habitat, including:

  • the establishment of over 30 acres in local ecotype native grasslands with over 50 wildflower species (such as milkweed for pollinators)
  • a variety of wetland and woodland habitats.

Portia observes that over the years the Kentucky Division of Forestry in Grayson County has provided outstanding service to their family by guiding them through stewardship options, educating them on the implications of different practices, and connecting them with various programs to help implement their plan. Federal programs including CRP & EQIP, administered through NRCS, have provided financial aid that made it feasible to implement many of the practices. State assistance has also come through KY Fish & Wildlife and The Nature Conservancy.

 

Leopold Conservation Award 2018 Call for Applications

If you, or someone you know, is a Kentucky landowner who is committed to land management practices that increase conservation, the Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts invites your application for the Leopold Conservation Award.

Sand County Foundation, the Kentucky Agricultural Council and KACD are accepting applications for the 2018 Leopold Conservation Award program in Kentucky. The $10,000 award honors Kentucky farmers, ranchers and other private landowners who voluntarily demonstrate outstanding stewardship and management of natural resources.

Given in honor of renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold, the Leopold Conservation Award recognizes extraordinary achievement in voluntary conservation. It inspires other landowners through these examples and provides a visible forum where farmers, ranchers and other private landowners are recognized as conservation leaders. The Leopold Conservation Award Program is offered in the following states: California, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Nebraska, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Application deadline for the 2018 award is spring 2018. See the 2018 Leopold brochure (2017 winner) (v.3) for information on applying or on candidate nomination.

Mail all materials to:

Leopold Conservation Award

c/o Franklin County Conservation District

103 Lakeview Court

Frankfort, Kentucky 40601

 

To submit materials electronically, email materials to:

Steve Coleman, colemansteve51@gmail.com, 502-330-5044

The award will be presented at the Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts annual convention in July 2018.

KWOA member Charles Williams, Hart County tree farmer, was the 2015 recipient. The 2017 Kentucky winner is Harry (KWOA board member) and Karen Pelle’s Tallow Creek Farm in Taylor County. The Pelle’s timber stand improvements have enhanced their forest crop, wildlife habitat and growth of forest floor vegetation. Their forest generates addition income through the sale of carbon credits to help sustain their conservation practice.

KWOA is a sponsor of the KLC award.

KWOF accepting applications for UK forestry student SCHOLARSHIP AWARD

 

The Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation is again sponsoring a scholarship award in the amount of $1000 to eligible students in the University of Kentucky forestry program.

Applications for the scholarship are due no later than October 9, 2017.

See the KWOF Scholarship Application BELOW  for further information and instructions on how to apply.

 

KWOF Scholarship Application – Fall 2017

Provided by the Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation

dmclaren@uky.edu

editor@kwoa.net

 Make available (electronic or paper) the Student Information, Personal Reflection Statement and Letter(s) of Recommendation to:

 Doug McLaren, Vice President of KWOA/KWOF

330 Cave Run Circle

Versailles, KY 40383

dmclaren@uky.edu

 

Fall 2017 Annual Reflection Statement for the KWOF Scholarship Award 

It is almost over!

Just like the old saying, “I can see the light at the end of the tunnel”. Your college training in the field of forestry is almost complete. Just a few more semesters.

It is always important to keep a strong view on the future but many times the future has been based and grounded on some event of the past.

Looking back over the classes that you have taken to prepare you for your college degree in forestry, what one course can you point to that you feel solidified the idea that a career in forestry was going to be a good match for you.

 

Deadline – this application deadline is October 9th, 2017

Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation Scholarship

 PURPOSE: The purpose of the Kentucky Woodlands Owners Foundation Scholarship is to provide annually an award to an outstanding student enrolled in the University of Kentucky’s professional forestry degree program. Awards will be granted on the basis of leadership potential, connection with the forestry community, and insight for the forestry profession.

 

ELIGIBILITY: Applicants for the Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation Scholarship must be a full-time University of Kentucky undergraduate student in the professional program of forestry and have a minimum ranking of senior at the time of the October 9th deadline date but has not graduated. The award can only be awarded to any one person once.

 

SCHOLARSHIP: The Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation Scholarship is in the amount of $1000. These monies will be paid directly to the University of Kentucky for tuition fees. The award announcement will be no later than December 8th, 2017.

 

AWARD SELECTION: Scholarship recipients will be selected on a competitive basis by using a combination of criteria which include but not limited to: leadership potential, extracurricular activities, community service, and written submission as required for the award. This is not an academic scholarship.

 

APPLICATIONS:  Application should be returned to the Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation’s Vice President, Doug McLaren, 330 Cave Run Circle, Versailles, KY 40383 either by land mail or an electronic version.

 

If you have any questions, call, 859.881.8583 or email dmclaren@uky.edu

 

KEY DATES: Completed and submitted application date will be no later than October 9th, 2017. Scholarship awards will be announced by December 8th, 2017 for tuition payment. It is requested but not mandated that the recipient of the award attend the Kentucky Woodland Owners Association annual meeting (normally during the spring season) to be recognized for the award. Costs for attending will be defrayed.

 

APPLICATION SUMMARY: The following information and documents must be submitted to be accepted as a complete application packet by the student. If any of the information is missing on the deadline date of         October 9th, 2017 the applicant will not be eligible for the award.

 

First Section (limited to one page)Student information: Complete name, address, telephone number, and email address. Please make notation of your high school. On this page will also be where you may make any statements concerning your academic performance and contributions either in school leading to your entrance into the forestry program at the University of Kentucky or contributions you have made while at the forestry program. Please feel free to list any influences that were made to your making the decision to major in forestry.  This page provides you the opportunity to discuss your interest and desire to be involved in forestry.

 

Second SectionRecommendation(s): Requested that you have a least one formal letter of recommendation from a member of the Forestry and Natural Resources Department at the University of Kentucky (teaching, research, or Cooperative Extension).

Concluding SectionPersonal Reflection Statement:  You will be asked to provide your personal reflections on an “Annual Reflection Statement” (2017 – “It is almost over!”) It will change annually. Your remarks to this statement will be confined to 500 words. Go to www.kwoa.net and click on top banner NEWS and EVENTS and then mid screen Forest Updates

 

Jack Stickney Named Kentucky Tree Farmer of the Year

From the Kentucky Forest Industries Association newsroom:

 Jack Stickey from Irvine, Kentucky was recently honored as the 2016 Kentucky Tree Farmer of the Year at the KFIA 52nd Annual Meeting in Lexington. Stickney was selected from a number of nominations submitted to the state Tree Farm Committee from throughout Kentucky.

Steve Gray, KY Tree Farm Chairman (right) present Jack. & Teresa Stickney with the Kentucky Tree Farmer of the Year award and a STIHL Farm Boss Chain saw donated by Bryan Equipment Sales.
Photo courtesy KFIA

Stickney’s 100 acre Tree Farm in Estill County, Kentucky is managed for a wide range of benefits including timber production, wildlife and recreation.  The tree farm is also used for numerous educational purposes for environmental classes and has also hosted a regional woodland owners short course.

 

Jack is a KWOA board member for its eastern zone.

Douglas McLaren Named KFIA Communicator of the Year

From the KFIA newsroom:

Doug McLaren, retired from University of Kentucky Department of Forestry in Lexington, KY was recently honored as the 2016 Kentucky Forest Industries Association Communicator of the Year at the Kentucky Forest Industries Association (KFIA) 52nd Annual Meeting in Lexington.

McLaren has reached all segments of the forest products supply chain through his leadership and communication efforts as vice president of the Kentucky Woodland Owners Association.

KFIA Executive Director Bob Bauer (r) presents Doug McLaren (l) with the Kentucky Forest Industries Communicator of the Year award. Photo courtesy KFIA

McLaren has been influential to his profession, community and region aggressively communicating the issues that affect the wood industry all the while promoting professionalism by encouraging others to get involved in outreach efforts

UK Forestry Extension Taking the Lead on Establishing a White Oak Partnership

Interest and demand for white oak timber supply is extremely high which has raised some concerns about the long-term sustainability of this invaluable resource. To address this concern, the Sustainability of White Oak Timber Conference was held at the Kentucky Forest Industries Annual Meeting on April 4, 2017. This conference was hosted by UK Forestry Extension—this is the second white oak meeting they have organized to address white oak supply in the last few years. Approximately 100 people attended the one day Sustainability of White Oak Timber Conference which provided information to industries dependent upon white oak and organizations/agencies associated with these industries. State and national experts provided updates on oak stand development, current forest inventory and monitoring, the issues affecting future white oak supply, and the need to establish a White Oak Partnership. There was overwhelming support amongst those in attendance to create a White Oak Partnership to address the following:

  • Proper monitoring of white oak growth and drain
  • Resources focused on addressing white oak threats
  • Economic modelling associated with determining white oak availability
  • Elected officials and governmental organizations understand the importance of this resource
  • Development of a National White Oak Initiative to help protect and improve white oak sustainability

If you would like to learn more about the White Oak Partnership please visit www.ukforestry.org or call Dr. Jeff Stringer at 859.257.5994.

Updates from our cooperators – first quarter 2017

Forest fires

The Kentucky Division of Forestry implemented some novel procedures to address the 2016 fall forest fire hazard season (October 1 through December 15). Bill Steele, KDF Director, reported that 50,000 acres burned in the state last fall. KDF gave crash courses in fire fighting to staff from the state Mining and Fish &Wildlife agencies, as well as volunteer firemen in 2016. The agency plans to increase the number of seasonal firefighters whose pay is funded during the fire season. This expansion will free up its rangers in 2017 to implement prescribed burns, trail maintenance, invasives control and streamside management. (The spring fire season stretches from February 15 through April 30.)

Logging inspections

The above changes to rangers’ duties also intends for them to conduct fewer logging operation inspections. There are currently 50 rangers qualified to inspect logging sites who conduct 80-90 inspections per year.  By law the rangers are only required to respond to complaints, bad actors and requests for assistance.

Tree nurseries

Kentucky’s two nurseries have lost $400,000 in the last two years. The goal is to have them break even in the next two years. One initiative will be to grow more white oak with assistance from the state’s distilleries who require this species for their bourbon barrels. Another push will be plant tree seedlings on 140,000 acres of abandoned mined lands in eastern Kentucky. Although there are some land preparation and property ownership issues, Pam Snyder reported that there is Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation funding for the tree planting.

Forest management plans and NRCS

Progress in reinstating NRCS (Natural Resources Conservation Service) reimbursement to KDF for marking trees should expedite the backlog of forest management plans. NRCS is also expanding the number of technical service providers (private consulting foresters who have met the TSP certification) to write Conservation Activity Plans for Forest Management (CAP-FM). In addition, the traditional Conservation Stewardship Plan is being expanded to include a practice plan and new program elements now called enhancements. Two thirds of the enhancements are forestry or wildlife related. Hopefully this change will speed up the EQIP (Environmental Quality Incentives Program) application process.

UK Forestry Department Chair Red Baker accepts position at University of Florida; Jeff Stringer steps up as interim chair at UK

Dr. Red Baker has left the UK Department of Forestry to accept a position at the University of Florida.

Terrell “Red” Baker assumed the position of chair of the University of Kentucky Department of Forestry in 2010. Baker came to UK from New Mexico State University. His assessment of his new duties at that time were that “The bones of this department are very strong. There’s a group of very motivated faculty and staff who are 100 percent committed to making good things happen. I view it as part of my job to help them do that, to help them be successful.”

Red Baker’s farewell comments elicit a grin from in-coming interim chair Jeff Stringer

Dr. Baker was a regular at KWOA events and a valuable resource throughout his tenure at UK. His thoughts regarding his departure from UK:  “I am proud of what we accomplished together over the last 7 years. I am confident the department will continue to do great things and I look forward to hearing about its many successes to come in the future.”

Henry Duncan, Frank Hicks and Cliff Taylor attended farewell luncheon for KWOA

Red began his new position in his home state at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences as the new director of the UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation on April 1.

Thanks to the educators and cooperators who made the KWOA 2017 a success

KWOA appreciates the time, travel and expertise of the many professionals who participated in its annual meeting at Natural Bridge State Park. Their expertise, availability for questions and dedication to their various roles in private woodlands management inspired and clarified the future for woodlands owners attending the annual meeting.

Brown Forman Corporation

H&S Lumber Mill

Kentucky Division of Forestry

Kentucky Forest Industries Association

Powell Valley Millwork

University of Kentucky Forestry Extension

University of Kentucky Department of Forestry

Christopher J. Will, ACF, Central Kentucky Forest Management, Inc.

Kate Robie, Retired Timberland Investment Professional