Category Archives: Practices

Best management practices for woodland managagement

Tune in to weekly radio broadcast for woodland owners

From the Woods Kentucky is a weekly radio show broadcast by the University of Kentucky Department of Forestry and Natural Resources on WRFL 88.1 FM Lexington. The show airs spring semester 2019 on Mondays from 11 am until noon on 88.1 FM in Lexington.

Recordings of From the Woods Kentucky are archived for listening at your convenience. Prior topics include firewood, woodlands owners, deer, watersheds, citizen science and many more.

Getting to Know Your Woodlands: A Primer for Beginners Webinar Series Starting February 21, 2019

UK Forestry Extension is partnering with some of our sister Forestry Extension programs in nearby states such as Missouri, Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina to offer a webinar series targeting “beginning woodland owners”; however, there is sure to be something for even the most seasoned woodland owner as well. The series will feature forestry and wildlife experts from around the region. So far, 34 County Extension Offices have signed on to host one or more of the webinars. Click herehttp://forestry.ca.uky.edu/webinars_upcoming > to find the closest hosting counties and make plans to join us for this informative and educational series.

The webinars will run from 7- 9P EST (6P – 8P CST).

Feb. 21 – Getting to Know Your Woodlands
How has past land use shaped our forests? Why are your woodlands important? Learn what you need to know about management plans.

Feb. 28 – Managing Your Woodlands
What should you do with neglected woodlands? Pine and hardwood management

Mar. 7 – Identifying and Managing Woodland Threats
Invasive plants, insects (native and exotic), diseases (native and exotic) and wildfire.

Mar. 14 – Wildlife and Woodlands
Wildlife habitat requirements and enhancing habitat for game and non-game wildlife.

Mar. 21 –  Forestry and Wildlife Assistance in Kentucky
Learn about the forestry and wildlife assistance available in Kentucky to help you care for and get the most from your woodlands.

 

New Video Highlighting Forestry and the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act

UK Forestry Extension. Check out this great video highlighting forestry and the  Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act which features Kentucky Master Woodland Steward and Kentucky Woodland Owners Association Board Member Harry Pelle and his wife Karen.

Learn how the Pelle’s have implemented numerous conservation practices that benefit their woodlands and help to enhance water quality in Kentucky. To learn more about the Kentucky Agricultural Water Quality Act and how to make your own ag water quality plan, please click here.

Woodland Management Help in Central and Northeast Kentucky

UK Forestry Extension. Woodland owners in Central and Northeast Kentucky have a new opportunity to receive woodland management plans through a recently awarded Regional Conservation Partnership Program project entitled “Increasing Farm Bill Participation and Benefits”. The project’s primary goal is to service a backlog of requests for woodland management plans in KDF’s Central and Northeast regions. The University of Kentucky Department of Forestry and the Kentucky Division of Forestry developed and were awarded this USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) project that utilizes financial assistance through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) to develop new woodland management plans for Kentucky landowners. If you have been waiting to have a woodland management plan developed and your property is in the project area, please visit your local NRCS office and let them know you want to participate in the UK Forestry-RCPP program. Got questions or need more information? Please email or call Billy Thomas at billy.thomas@uky.edu or call 859.257.9153.

Restorative Forestry Field Day on February 2 in Henry County

UK Forestry Extension. Tom Grissom, a Kentucky Master Woodland Steward, is partnering with the Berry Center and Sterling College to offer a forestry field day on his farm highlighting low impact logging tactics and techniques.

FIELD DAY: Drennon Woods farm, 723 Barton Lane (off the Pt. Pleasant Rd.), Pleasureville, KY, 40057. Instructional program will include restorative forestry practices harvesting red cedars in order to regenerate and thin mixed uneven-aged hardwoods on abandoned subsistence farm lands.  Saturday, Feb. 2, 10 a.m. to noon.

Kentucky Leopold Conservation Award Seeks Nominees

January 2, 2019

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Steve Coleman, colemansteve51@gmail.com, 502.330.5044

Casey Langan, clangan@sandcountyfoundation.org, 608.663.4605 ext. 32

FRANKFORT, KY. — Know a Kentucky farmer or forester who goes above and beyond in the care and management of natural resources? Nominate them for the 2019 Kentucky Leopold Conservation Award®.

Sand County Foundation, the nation’s leading voice for conservation of private land, presents the Leopold Conservation Award to private landowners in 14 states for extraordinary achievement in voluntary conservation. In Kentucky, the $10,000 award is presented with the Kentucky Agricultural Council and the Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts.

Given in honor of renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold, the award recognizes landowners who inspire others with their dedication to land, water and wildlife habitat management on private, working land. In his influential 1949 book, “A Sand County Almanac,” Leopold called for an ethical relationship between people and the land they own and manage.

Nominations may be submitted on behalf of a landowner, or landowners may nominate themselves. The application can be found at: https://sandcountyfoundation.org/uploads/Kentucky-CFN-2019.pdf

The application deadline date is April 1, 2019. The committee prefers application materials to be sent electronically. To do so, please e-mail materials to colemansteve51@gmail.com.

Materials may be mailed to:

Leopold Conservation Award

c/o Franklin County Conservation District

103 Lakeview Court, Frankfort, KY 40601

The 2018 recipient of the award was Trunnell Family Farm from Utica.

The Kentucky Leopold Conservation Award is made possible thanks to the generous support and partnership of Kentucky Agricultural Council, Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts, Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation, Kentucky Department of Agriculture, Kentucky Corn Growers Association, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Kentucky Woodland Owner’s Association, Kentucky Tree Farm Committee, Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association, AgriBusiness Association of Kentucky, Kentucky Pork Producers, The Nature Conservancy in Kentucky, and the U.S Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

For more information on the award, visit www.leopoldconservationaward.org

ABOUT THE LEOPOLD CONSERVATION AWARD

The Leopold Conservation Award is a competitive award that recognizes landowner achievement in voluntary conservation. The award consists of $10,000 and a crystal depicting Aldo Leopold. Sand County Foundation presents Leopold Conservation Awards in California, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

 

ABOUT SAND COUNTY FOUNDATION

Sand County Foundation inspires and enables a growing number of private landowners to ethically manage natural resources in their care, so future generations have clean and abundant water, healthy soil to support agriculture and forestry, plentiful habitat for wildlife and opportunities for outdoor recreation.

 

KENTUCKY AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL

The Kentucky Agricultural Council is a 501(c)(3) organization consisting of some 80 agricultural organizations representing all sectors of Kentucky agriculture. The membership is composed of commodity groups, state and federal agricultural organizations, agricultural trade organizations and the state’s institutions of higher education that serve Kentucky agriculture. The KAC functions as an umbrella group and hub for its members, disseminating information and promoting coordination among all agricultural organizations and sectors. Since 2006, the KAC also has served as the “steward of strategic planning” for the future of Kentucky agriculture and Kentucky’s rural communities. www.kyagcouncil.net.

 

KENTUCKY ASSOCIATION OF CONSERVATION DISTRICTS

The Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts is 501(c)(3) organization consisting of Kentucky’s local conservation districts and watershed conservancy districts. KACD encourages the exchange of information relating to the administration and operation of conservation districts and watershed conservancy districts; to affect cooperation between districts and agencies and organizations concerned with any and all phases of soil and water conservation; to promote the welfare of conservation districts and watershed conservancy districts and the people therein; and to maintain strong and active membership in both KACD and the National Association of Conservation Districts.

California fires spark debate over forest management

Can most of the blame for California’s devastating wildfires be attributed to the state’s forest management? Fire scientists recognize a larger effect from climate change in promoting abnormally dry conditions and dead trees. The first nine months of 2018 have been the fourth-warmest on record for California. This past summer was the second-hottest on record in the state. An additional factor is the encroachment of urban development on wildlands.

Most of California’s forests are under federal or private control. US agriculture and interior secretaries Perdue and Zinke are pressing for farm bill authorizations in the current House version of the bill (Forestry Title of H.R. 2) which includes amendments mandating a controversial expansion of “categorical exclusions,” which allow land managers to fast track forest management projects and largely bypass environmental review. Read the transcript for a National Public Radio interview with Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, who oversees the U.S. Forest Service.

Leading experts in forest ecology management think the Forest Title in the House version of the Farm Bill  does not properly address science-based prevention programs such as controlled burning and fuel reduction in wildland urban interface areas as well as the critical role of climate change. Instead it focuses on accelerated commercial logging and road building which generally exacerbate fire risk. The House bill’s forestry provisions also expand post-fire “salvage” logging which they contend contributes to ecological recovery in the disturbed area. New “categorical exclusions” limit input from state wildlife agencies among others. Read more 

Greg Aplet, science director for the Wilderness Society in Denver, takes the view of many wildfire behavior scientists: If the goal is to protect communities and lives from fire, the emphasis first needs to be on clearing out those dried out fine fuels, the understory, from the forest floor, not the green live trees. “The Forest Service often lacks the personnel and the resources to do the types of landscape-scale restoration work that needs to be done,” says Nick Smith, executive director of Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities, a non-profit forestry group. Read more

According to Dr. Chad Hanson, director and principal ecologist for the California-based John Muir Project, logging, including many projects deceptively promoted as forest “thinning,” removes fire-resistant trees, reduces the cooling shade of the forest canopy and leaves behind highly combustible twigs and branches. Read more:… The California fires took place in some of the most heavily logged areas of the Sierra Nevada range.

A study by Hanson and others of whether increased forest protection corresponds to higher severity in frequent-fire forests of the western US found that forests with higher levels of protection had lower severity values even though they are generally identified as having the highest overall levels of biomass and fuel loading. Some of these researchers have hypothesized that as forests mature, the overstory canopy results in cooling shade that allows surface fuels to stay moister longer into fire season. This effect may also lead to a reduction in pyrogenic native shrubs and other understory vegetation that can carry fire, due to insufficient sunlight reaching the understory.

In general, their findings—that forests with the highest levels of protection from logging tend to burn least severely—suggest a need for managers and policymakers to rethink current forest and fire management direction, particularly proposals that seek to weaken forest protections or suspend environmental laws ostensibly to facilitate a more extensive and industrial forest–fire management regime.

New Kentucky Logging BMP Field Guide

The September 2018 field guide to the minimum requirements for logging Best Management Practices in Kentucky (FOR-130) is now available from the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

The practices are designed specifically for logging operations to use before, during and after timber harvesting. If implemented correctly they will reduce or eliminate water pollutants that have the potential to be generated from logging operations where drainage channels and water bodies are present. The guide contains recommendations that can be used to effectively and efficiently implement the minimum requirements.

November 15 board meeting highlights for cooperators

Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy

KWOA participated in a September 19th meeting with this organization which coordinates the distribution of funds received by the state as a result of the tobacco settlement. There appears to be an opportunity for KWOA to initiate innovative programs that would be expected to result in more Kentucky landowners actively managing their woodlands. These might include education and/or demonstration programs administrated by others.

Health Task Force

KWOA and others are in the process of gathering data to submit to the Farm Service Agency for approval of an application for assistance to woodland owners for Emerald Ash Borer losses. There is also renewed interest in the Health Care Task Force which KWOA was instrumental in establishing. A meeting to explore starting a new task force is scheduled for December 5 at the UK Extension.

Kentucky Farm Bureau

Sections of the policy book are being changed to better reflect the role of forestry in the organization. The Forestry Commodity Session at the KFB annual meeting will be held November 29. Forestry will be included in Harlan County educational programs. KFB is encouraging the formation of a new program called “Ag in the Mountains,” which will include forestry. Input on what might be included in these programs is welcome.

UK Forestry Extension

Segments from the extension’s fall weekly radio program “From the WoodsKY” [https://forestry.ca.uky.edu/fromthewoodsky] are archived for those who would like to listen to them.

Topics include Christmas trees, herpetology, Robinson Forest, bats, urban forest initiative, fall colors, martial eagles, black bears, green forests work, forest health and what is forestry?

 

 

The extension is also launching a webinar series – Getting to Know Your Woodlands: A Primer for Beginners. The 4-5 two hour webinars will be held at county extension offices and other meeting spaces. Topics will include the southern forest and your woodland, getting to know your woodlands, managing your woodlands, identifying and managing woodland threats and wildlife and woodlands. The webinars will run on Thursdays from 7-9P (EST) on February 21, February 28, March 7, March 7 and an option field tour or extra local session on March 21.

The extension has produced a new video of its student Kentucky Leadership Program which will be run at the KWOA annual meeting.

Kentucky Tree Farm System

The Kentucky Tree Farm White Oak Initiative will hold a December meeting at Buffalo Trace Distillery in Frankfort. The American Tree Farm System’s national meeting will convene February 26-28, 2019 in Louisville.

Sustainability of White Oak Timber – an April 2017 conference – was specifically for the industries dependent upon white oak including forest industries, industries using white oak casks, and organizations and agencies associated with these industries. https://forestry.ca.uky.edu/white_oak

USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service  Jared Calvert said the allocation for EQUIP has not been determined. Woody residue treatment for ash has been recommended for EQUIP funding at $700 per acre. White oak promotion, rare and declining habitat and prescribed burning are also factors in EQUIP rankings.