Category Archives: Practices

Best management practices for woodland managagement

Woodland Owners Short Course

The University of Kentucky Forestry Extension is holding its 2017 Woodland Owner Short Course program on Saturdays in different regions of the state. The WOSC, now in its 14th year, is a great opportunity for woodland owners and their families to learn how to enhance their woodlands and get the most from their ownership experience. KWOF is pleased to be a sponsor of the program.

WOSC Participants take wagon ride.

If you haven’t attended one of these field days, if you feel in need of a refresher course or have new questions and concerns, consider attending a short course.

For more information and to register go to:

https://www3.ca.uky.edu/forestry/wosc-2017/new.php or call 859-257-7597 or view the WOSC Brochure.

Warren County

Aug 26 2017 – 9:00am to 4:30pm

Kenton County

Sep 23 2017 – 9:00am to 4:30pm

The regional programs have been developed by local planning committees with local needs in mind and cover a wide variety of subjects. The WOSC offers two programming tracks: green for woodland owners just getting started and gold for those already actively managing their woodlands.

Register now because space is limited.

Single registration price is $20; couple registration is $30.

Salt River Watershed Watch 2017

The Salt River Watershed Watch project plants trees, shrubs and grasses in riparian areas to improve water quality. The project is designed to raise awareness of the importance of the riparian zone, and the important part it plays in water quality.  Last fall SRWW volunteers planted 1500 trees and hundreds of grasses and forbes along streams in Jefferson, Meade and Nelson counties.

The project focuses on Breckinridge, Bullitt, Jefferson, Oldham and Shelby Counties but will work anywhere in the basin. It is looking for landowners to provide property for plantings.

Identify riparian planting sites.  If you own land along a creek you may nominate it. We will secure agreements with the landowners to allow us to come onto the property and they need to be willing to provide maintenance of trees/shrub seedlings for at least the first two years. If you know of a site with habitat that would be classified as “marginal” or “poor” please email Stephen Perry, Riparian Corridor Enhancement Project Manager at at sperry40055@att.net.

More information about the project and its latest progress reports go to https://sites.google.com/site/saltriverwatershedwatch/.

The project is supported by the Virginia Environmental Endowment, Kentucky Woodland Owners Association, UK Extension Service and Jefferson County Extension Office. The Salt River project is a pilot that hopes to be the lead on a statewide project.

Jack Stickney Named Kentucky Tree Farmer of the Year

From the Kentucky Forest Industries Association newsroom:

 Jack Stickey from Irvine, Kentucky was recently honored as the 2016 Kentucky Tree Farmer of the Year at the KFIA 52nd Annual Meeting in Lexington. Stickney was selected from a number of nominations submitted to the state Tree Farm Committee from throughout Kentucky.

Steve Gray, KY Tree Farm Chairman (right) present Jack. & Teresa Stickney with the Kentucky Tree Farmer of the Year award and a STIHL Farm Boss Chain saw donated by Bryan Equipment Sales.
Photo courtesy KFIA

Stickney’s 100 acre Tree Farm in Estill County, Kentucky is managed for a wide range of benefits including timber production, wildlife and recreation.  The tree farm is also used for numerous educational purposes for environmental classes and has also hosted a regional woodland owners short course.

 

Jack is a KWOA board member for its eastern zone.

UK Forestry Extension Taking the Lead on Establishing a White Oak Partnership

Interest and demand for white oak timber supply is extremely high which has raised some concerns about the long-term sustainability of this invaluable resource. To address this concern, the Sustainability of White Oak Timber Conference was held at the Kentucky Forest Industries Annual Meeting on April 4, 2017. This conference was hosted by UK Forestry Extension—this is the second white oak meeting they have organized to address white oak supply in the last few years. Approximately 100 people attended the one day Sustainability of White Oak Timber Conference which provided information to industries dependent upon white oak and organizations/agencies associated with these industries. State and national experts provided updates on oak stand development, current forest inventory and monitoring, the issues affecting future white oak supply, and the need to establish a White Oak Partnership. There was overwhelming support amongst those in attendance to create a White Oak Partnership to address the following:

  • Proper monitoring of white oak growth and drain
  • Resources focused on addressing white oak threats
  • Economic modelling associated with determining white oak availability
  • Elected officials and governmental organizations understand the importance of this resource
  • Development of a National White Oak Initiative to help protect and improve white oak sustainability

If you would like to learn more about the White Oak Partnership please visit www.ukforestry.org or call Dr. Jeff Stringer at 859.257.5994.

Updates from our cooperators – first quarter 2017

Forest fires

The Kentucky Division of Forestry implemented some novel procedures to address the 2016 fall forest fire hazard season (October 1 through December 15). Bill Steele, KDF Director, reported that 50,000 acres burned in the state last fall. KDF gave crash courses in fire fighting to staff from the state Mining and Fish &Wildlife agencies, as well as volunteer firemen in 2016. The agency plans to increase the number of seasonal firefighters whose pay is funded during the fire season. This expansion will free up its rangers in 2017 to implement prescribed burns, trail maintenance, invasives control and streamside management. (The spring fire season stretches from February 15 through April 30.)

Logging inspections

The above changes to rangers’ duties also intends for them to conduct fewer logging operation inspections. There are currently 50 rangers qualified to inspect logging sites who conduct 80-90 inspections per year.  By law the rangers are only required to respond to complaints, bad actors and requests for assistance.

Tree nurseries

Kentucky’s two nurseries have lost $400,000 in the last two years. The goal is to have them break even in the next two years. One initiative will be to grow more white oak with assistance from the state’s distilleries who require this species for their bourbon barrels. Another push will be plant tree seedlings on 140,000 acres of abandoned mined lands in eastern Kentucky. Although there are some land preparation and property ownership issues, Pam Snyder reported that there is Abandoned Mined Land Reclamation funding for the tree planting.

Forest management plans and NRCS

Progress in reinstating NRCS (Natural Resources Conservation Service) reimbursement to KDF for marking trees should expedite the backlog of forest management plans. NRCS is also expanding the number of technical service providers (private consulting foresters who have met the TSP certification) to write Conservation Activity Plans for Forest Management (CAP-FM). In addition, the traditional Conservation Stewardship Plan is being expanded to include a practice plan and new program elements now called enhancements. Two thirds of the enhancements are forestry or wildlife related. Hopefully this change will speed up the EQIP (Environmental Quality Incentives Program) application process.

Intergenerational transfer of family farm is cyclical, not linear

“Don’t worry, I’ll take care of you” is the ultimate conversation stopper, says Steve Isaacs, UK extension coordinator for farm management, in the complex and often unpleasant and unproductive dialogue between family generations regarding what will happen to the family farm.

Steve Isaacs de-bunks popular myths about how to transfer the family farm
Photo by Billy Thomas, UK Forestry Extension

Family farm succession is about more than legal and tax implications according to Dr. Isaacs who is also director for the UK Tax Education Program. It is about the transfer of assets, management, leadership and, yes, debt in a cyclical process.

Isaacs stressed that the first priority in this cycle is assuring an adequate retirement income for the parents. The estate tax is a paper tiger for most people; “death taxes don’t destroy family farms… families do.”

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics there are only two categories of workers that are older than farmers – school crossing guards and Walmart greeters.

Isaacs recommended engaging a transition team familiar with farmland issues that could include an attorney, accountant, financial planner, lender, extension educator and/or business consultant. This team’s function is to identify and generate ideas, technical information, evaluation and suggestions.

Isaacs recommended conducting the transition discussion at a neutral location, not at the family kitchen table. He advised treating siblings fairly, not necessarily equally and include spouses in the discussion.

A facilitator and recorder will summarize and document the items on which the family has agreed.

With some guidance and a transition plan, Isaacs says the conversation by the entire family can become “Here’s how we’re going to take care of things.”

Steve will be conducting a full day session on this subject in the near future. Check our events page for that announcement.

KWOF approves funding to support woodland education/practice initiatives in 2017

The Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation has been a long-time financial supporter of the Woodland Owners Short Course, an annual UK Forestry Extension student scholarship and the Leopold Conservation Award. At its February quarterly board meeting, members approved financial assistance to three projects that will inform and enhance woodland and watershed management.

$650 for the 2017 Woodland Owners Short Course (WOSC) workshops

$400 for two $200 competitive scholarships to the Kentucky Forestry Leadership Program, a weeklong program at Jabez for students interested in natural resource management

$500 to the Salt River Watershed Project managed through the Kentucky Waterways Alliance

Ancient American Chestnut makes surprising appearance on Pelle tree farm

Thanks to Harry Pelle, KWOA board member, for sharing this story

While marking fifty acres for a timber stand improvement project on their property on April 23rd, Harry and Karen Pelle along with Chris Will, their consulting forester, found quite a welcome surprise. They discovered a couple of American Chestnut root sprouts. Harry admits there have been other aspiring chestnut seedlings over the thirty years the Pelle’s have been traversing their tree farm near Bradfordsville but they didn’t know what to look for.

The day before, Earth Day, they had helped plant 1200 American Chestnuts at Eastern Kentucky University’s Taylor Fork Ecological Area.

Earth Day 2016 - EKU faculty, staff, students and volunteers join The American Chestnut Foundation to plant 1200 American Chestnuts in Taylor Fork Ecological Area on Arbor Day
Earth Day 2016 – EKU faculty, staff, students and volunteers join The American Chestnut Foundation to plant 1200 American Chestnuts in Taylor Fork Ecological Area on Arbor Day

The effort with The American Chestnut Foundation seeks to restore the iconic tree as a staple in eastern forests.

April 22, 2016 – Karen and Harry Pelle volunteer with EKU American Chestnut planting
April 22, 2016 – Karen and Harry Pelle volunteer with EKU American Chestnut planting

 

That recent experience may have made the Pelle’s more aware of the chestnut’s latest effort to re-establish itself in the territory where it once reigned.

The Pelle’s marked the spot where they found the tree sprouts on Chris’s GPS and with a tee post.

April 23, 2016 – Newly discovered American Chestnut sprouts on Pelle tree farm
April 23, 2016 – Newly discovered American Chestnut sprouts on Pelle tree farm

The Pelle’s also cleared the area around the sprouts of fallen tops and brush. They intend to monitor the potential trees’ progress and just maybe these two will beat the Chestnut Blight that decimated the regions mighty giants. It may be the next generation of Pelles that will have to continue the watch over the seedlings.

The newest trees are in good company. Harry has an American Chestnut restoration grove just down the hill from the little guys. He likes to think the trees’ ancestors are looking down the hill and cheering on their new cousins in the fight to beat the blight. Harry thinks the finding of the sprouts “might have been the chestnuts’ way of saying ‘thanks for the help.’”

 

Flowering pear trees becoming the scourge of central Kentucky woodland pastures

Central Kentucky still boasts one of the largest populations of presettlement trees in the nation according to Tom Kimmerer, scientist, photographer and former UK faculty member, in his new book Venerable Trees. However, these ancient trees and the remaining woodland pastures in which they reside are in danger. Chief among the culprits threatening these ancient trees is the flowering pear tree. “We have to stop planting Callery pears” says Kimmerer in an article in the March 30th Lexington Herald-Leader.

Wild invasive flowering pear trees in a field near a subdivision near Southpoint Dr. in Lexington, Ky., Monday, March 28, 2016.
Wild invasive flowering pear trees in a field near a subdivision near Southpoint Dr. in Lexington Photo courtesy Lexington Herald-Leader

Going by various names – Bradford, Callery, Cleveland Select -these cultivars interbreed and create an invasive wild population of hybrid Callery pear trees.

Birds and wind distribute the tasty fruit of these trees across fields where new trees are crowding out natives plants and trees. Callery pears have four-inch thorns that can’t be mowed down and can be removed only by steel-tracked bulldozers.

Article excerpts courtesy Lexington Herald-Leader

Industry Key to Conserving Forests as Demand for Wood Projected to Triple by 2050

World Wildlife Fund (January 28) – According to the latest installment of the World Wildlife Fund’s”Living Forests Report,”paper production and consumption is likely to double in the next three decades, and overall wood consumption may triple.

“A scenario of tripling the amount of wood society takes from forests and plantations needs to motivate good stewardship that safeguards forests, otherwise we could destroy the very places where wood grows,” said Rod Taylor, director of WWF’s Global Forest Program.