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KWOA POSITION STATEMENT

Mission Guide

Kentucky Wood Owners Association (KWOA) is the only statewide organization devoted exclusively to assisting its members in achieving their forest ownership goals. KWOA, a not-for-profit organization, is one of 36 state affiliate of the National Woodland Owners Association.  Membership is diverse with a variety of interests and sizes of ownership. Interests in woodland ownership include timber production, wildlife management, resource conservation and green space.  Membership includes absentee owners as well as those who reside on their woodland property. Ownership ranges from those with several acres to those with more than a thousand acres.

KWOA seeks to promote economically and environmentally sound forest management by advancing the skills of woodland owners and providing communications and networking.

Programs and policies are guided by woodland owner members and aim to protect member interests, seek fairness in addressing woodland issues while enhancing the value and benefits of Kentucky woodlands.

History and Background

An organizing meeting for Kentucky Woodland Owners Association was held February 12, 1994, as part of the University of Kentucky’s annual Forest Owners Seminar in Bardstown.  Later that month an organizing committee met at Gethsemani Abby and identified steps to formally organize.  On July 10, 1994, twelve woodland owners serving as directors approved Articles of Incorporation and By-laws. Formal incorporation was completed in August 1994. The November 6, 1994, directors meeting focused on charting a direction and planning activities that included plans for an annual meeting, membership drive and legislative strategy.

The Association’s initial strategy focused on three areas regarding use and management of Kentucky’s renewable resources:

1. Leadership

2.  Sustainable development and productivity

3.  Public awareness

MAJOR POLICY UPDATE OF 2004

The above policy guidance served the Association for the first 10 years.  Then in 2004 under the Association’s Woodland Economic Development Committee led by Dr. Herb Loyd and Bob Bauer, an updated and comprehensive policy statement was finalized and approved by the board of directors.

2004 POLICIES FOR BUILDING A STRONGER WOODLAND ECONOMY

Some 46 specific policies were outlined in the following areas:

Forest health, diversity and quality

Research and education

Markets

Incentives

Communications and consensus

EFFORTS TO UPDATE 2004 KWOA POSITION PAPER

The Association Board of Directors at the February 11, 2008 meeting adopted a plan prepared by the Policy Committee to update the 2004 KWOA position statement.  The Policy Committee chaired by Joe Ball met in Lexington February 25, 2008, and outlined assignments related to revising and adding new and emerging issues such as Biomass, carbon sequestration, certification, LEEDS, etc.  UK indicated interest in developing a mail survey to identify woodland owners’ areas of interest and emphasis. Response to assignments and enthusiasm was mixed.

Following a hiatus in late 2008 and early 2009 Chairman Ball sought ideas and suggestions related to updating the paper from several directors.  After circulating a discussion paper, he hosted an informal field trip to his tree farm October 21-23, 2009 to discuss a variety of policy, legislative and organizational issue. After reviewing notes and written comments from participants, in February and March of 2010 Don Girton summarized comments and suggestions. The results were then circulated for additional comments from committee members, county agents and some county Farm Bureau presidents.

Using the comments and suggestions from the above described sources; Chairman Ball using material from the aforementioned work prepared the following revised draft.

2011

I. CURRENT SITUATION – Indicators for future actions

Forest Resources

· 47% of land area in trees, with urban forests an important part.

· 95% of the private family timberland holdings are less than 100 acres.

· Kentucky 3rd In production of hardwood lumber, 10% of US production.

· Kentucky leading state in production of white oak timber.

Forest Economy

· Forestry is a major segment of Kentucky’s economy — $6-8 billion.

· Most lumber demand has not recovered following recession of 08-09.

· Returns to woodland owners estimated at only $186 million annually.

· 35,000 jobs in timber related industries, concentration in Louisville area.

Forest Management Challenges

· High percentage of timber is low quality and slow growth rate, resulting from past harvests of taking the best and leaving the rest.

· Tremendous potential to improve timber quality and quantity.

· Only a limited acreage of timber stand improvement carried out.

· Much of forest management, marketing and promotion are status quo.

· Market system is “primitive” and market prices difficult to obtain.

· Many veneer log sales handled by middle men, traders or “pin hookers,” making it difficult for landowners to know if they are realizing full value.

· Returns on investment for tree farmers are very low.

· Very limited acreage of timberland involved in structured stewardship or management program.

· Presently have 842 certified “Tree Farms” with approximately 220,000 acres in addition about 1,000 acres certified under Sustainable Forest Initiative (SFI). Supply of certified wood limited.

· Certified “Tree Farm” numbers not growing, may be declining.

· Investing in timber stand improvement for positive economic return requires careful consideration of costs and returns.

Policy Opportunities

· Kentucky lacks a comprehensive forestry statute, setting forth a shared vision for Kentucky’s forests.

· Presently public funding for forestry is very disproportional to the size of the forest economy.

· Interest in urban forest activities are growing and environmental groups are expressing a stronger concern for sustainable forests.

· Kentucky Revenue Cabinet’s guidelines for assessing timberlands are not fair or equitable when compared with other agricultural activities.

· Growing numbers of all-terrain vehicles (ATV) add concerns about increases in private property trespass, timber theft and wild fires.

KWOA Role

· An organization for woodland owner (KWOA) was established in 1994 and is affiliated with the National Woodland Owners Association (NWOA). KWOA has established itself by “networking” with other organizations sharing interest in forests.

· A limited number of county affiliates have been established. Most counties are without any kind of established forest organization or committee, even those with 90%+ of their land in forests.

II. NEW EMPHASIS – The trend of the day is to go “Green.”

Most of the major primary and secondary forest industries are pursuing ways to participate in some level of green certification. Pulp and paper people seem to be leading the charge.

Growing concern by the general public as they become stakeholders and exhibit interest in sequestering carbon in forests, clean water, aesthetics as well as more local utilization of products of the forest.

Government actions will greatly affect the timeliness of change as well as guidelines to follow.

Building codes are rapidly going green

Furniture and consumer products are going green

Energy production is going green and the forests may provide the greatest abundance of sustainable raw material such as:

· Biomass to alcohol

· Wood fiber to electricity

· Home and industrial heating from wood fibers

III. STRATEGIC PLAN – Actions Kentucky can take to enhance the value and sustain its most abundant natural resource to benefit all the citizens of the state; woodland owners up to the consumer of the environment.

1. Kentucky General Assembly needs to enact legislation to create a comprehensive forest program for Kentucky. Such an act would provide a shared (for all the players) identifiable vision for Kentucky forestry to move forward and include incentives for woodland owners to invest and better manage their woodlands to expand the resource base. Other states have such programs and we need to catch up.

2. KWOA favors implementing other sections of the Forest Conservation Act of 1998 in addition to water quality sections. Renew and modify sections of the act that speak to implementing Silvicultural practices as well as infrastructure for dedicated timber tracts which would provide for truck roads, landings, fire lanes, trails and water control measures.

3. KWOA favors an emphasis on third party certification to document green standards. Some form of 3rd party certification is necessary and becomes prerequisite to most future actions the woodland owner would take.  It might enable selling certified wood products, more fully participate in government assistance programs, selling carbon credits and documenting the fact that a timber tract is a managed farm, thus making it eligible to be assessed in accordance with farmland guidelines or other state mandated programs.

4. KWOA favors a “whole land practice” approach to implementing managing timber tracts, especially when government cost share is involved.

The stewardship plan would be the guide to the practices needed and the amount of cost share justified for the acreage.

Rather than just doing a harvest – approach your timber tract with a comprehensive plan—layout (NRCS technical help) and construct roads, log landings and fire lanes prior to harvest.

Harvest would focus on taking mature trees, removing culls, thinning and fighting invasive species. Upon completion, your forest would be ready to grow and produce the next crop.

Benefits of this practice are numerous. Cost of timber stand improvement would be less, roads would make all work easier and harvest more economical and water control maintenance more manageable. (90% of the negative effect of logging is erosion from poor roads.)

The “whole land practice” of managing a timber tract would very much involve the logger, if the landowner does not perform the harvest. Loggers are where the action takes place on the land and until the advent of the Master Logger Program these vital people had not been formally involved in education. The logger with the appropriate equipment and know how could perform the multiple practices more economically than individual practices.

5. KWOA is committed to a state level organization to represent the interest of woodland owners.  Resources are needed to meet that commitment. KWOA should explore all opportunities, following experiences of other states and continue to explore other opportunities such as government funds, private grants, product check off, mineral severance, etc.

6. In addition to a statewide organization, more structures need to be developed at the county and community level. KWOA is committed to networking with all government agencies and private organizations to provide a vehicle to provide education and technical assistance at those levels. This is especially an opportunity for the Land Grant University.

7. KWOA was successful in pulling together the resources at the state level of those most concerned with health of Kentucky forests. In addition to problems of invasive insects, diseases and plants, natural disasters take a toll on forests. Ice storm, tornados, droughts and other happenings stimulate federal disaster programs. A Health Task Force should be granted the responsibility and authority to take leadership for these programs at the state level.

8. KWOA favors a formal evaluation of the primary market system for wood material with special emphasis on looking at openness, fairness and competition from the position of the tree farmer selling logs and chip material. Most of the veneer logs are sold through middle men, traders or pin hookers who may subtract a high percentage of the profits from the woodland owner. What are the alternatives to making the market system more efficient and profitable for the logger and producer as well as providing mills the kinds of raw materials they process? Presently mills buy a lot of materials they are unable to process, thus requiring resale to other processors.

9. The Kentucky Agriculture News Service in cooperation with USDA provides market price information for most agriculture commodities. Such market information is not presently available to the logger and woodland owner. KWOA favors fairness in service from the Market News Service, thus make the markets more transparent.

10. The suppression of forest fires is a major budget item for the Kentucky Division of Forestry. Fire damage to woodlands and wildlife have untold economic impact. KWOA recommends creation of an “Ad Hock Task Force” to evaluate the economic and ecological impacts of wild fires along with an in-depth analysis of the existing fire prevention and suppression programs and related costs for the eastern Kentucky forests. If improvements could be made, recommendations would be forthcoming.

11. KWOA favors requiring a percentage of Kentucky electric generation to be powered from green sources. Since wood fiber is an abundant and renewable resource in the state, the utilization of low quality timber could have positive effects. To the logger and woodland owner it could become profitable to harvest this material and result in increased growth and quality of the next crop. To the electric generator it could improve combustion and reduce harmful emissions. Serious consideration should be given to possible negative consequences. Therefore, sustainable harvest protection would be required.

12. Continue to advocate fairness in timberland taxes. Seek to correct existing unlawful assessments of timberland by utilizing the recently completed study of University of Kentucky Department of Forestry that has developed assessed values for a variety of timber types and conditions.

13. Promote youth forestry education by offering scholarships for individuals intending to pursue careers in natural resources. Our Kentucky Woodland Owners Foundation, a 501(c)(3) not for profit corporation is in place to service the scholarship program as well as working with 4H and FFA on youth project.

14. Explore opportunities to develop through grants or partnerships a youth initiative utilizing social networking and/or programs such as Project Learning Tree.

15. Timber theft-property trespass – Open timber tracts in isolated locations are prone to timber theft and unauthorized trespass. The expanding number of all-terrain vehicles (ATV) continues to exacerbate the problems of soil erosion, noise, littering and increases the difficulty of dealing with arson fires.  The legislature needs to provide the public and law enforcement more tools for action in addressing this problem.

August 18, 2011, Draft Position Statement reviewed at KWOA Board meeting.

October 14, 2011, Revised with member and partner comments.

KWOA Policy Committee

L. D. “Joe” Ball, Chairman; Dr. James “Greg” Kuhns. Dr. James Corum; J. Henry Duncan; Don Girton

The Policy Committee thanks all association members and our many partners who provided ideas, comments and guidance in developing this policy statement.

APPROVED BY KENTUCKY WOODLAND OWNERS ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS AT ITS REGULAR MEETING ON NOVEMBER 17, 2011.

J. Henry Duncan, President

KY NRCS update on support for forest improvement

By Jerry L. Adams
KY NRCS State Forestry Coordinator

The Kentucky Natural Resources and Conservation Service continues to support forest resource improvement through its Forestland Initiative under the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). KY NRCS obligated $823K in 2011 to fund needed conservation practices identified in either a forest stewardship or forest management plan. Fiscal 2011 saw an increase in applications from woodland owners, totaling $1.4M in requests. Eighty two contracts were awarded statewide to fund 1100 acres of Brush Management (invasive species control), 2750 acres of Forest Stand Improvement and 92 acres of Tree & Shrub Establishment. Additionally, just over $550K was obligated from the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP) for forestry related practices.

Woodland owners compete statewide among other woodland owners for EQIP funding. This change, along with the establishment of the Forestland Initiative by KY NRCS, demonstrates its commitment to addressing the resource concern issues woodland owners are experiencing. Although funding for FY2012 is still undetermined, sources indicate that there should be little reduction in program dollars. Woodland owners with stewardship and forest management plans containing recommended conservation practices eligible through EQIP should complete a 2012 funding application at any time by stopping by their local USDA Service Center.

Woodland owners with outdated stewardship/forest management plans should consider applying to EQIP for a Conservation Activity Plan -Forest Management (CAP-FM). The CAP-FM is a forest management plan developed by a private consultant forester certified as a Technical Service Provider (TSP) through NRCS. Plans older than 5 years are eligible for the CAP-FM. Woodland owners are free to chose any one of the currently eight TSPs available in KY to complete the plan. Once completed, any CAP-FM recommended practices the TSP identifies can be addressed in future EQIP contracts.

Proposals to expand water quality protection standards could affect private landowners

Several actions taken by or against the US Environmental Protection Agency last spring regarding water quality could ultimately affect timber harvest and woodlands management practices.

The EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued draft guidance in April on what constitutes the EPA’s jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act. EPA describes “other waters” as “all other waters such as intrastate lakes, rivers, streams (including intermittent streams),mudflats, sandflats, wetlands, sloughs, prairie potholes, wet meadows, playa lakes, or natural ponds, the use, degradation or destruction of which could affect interstate or foreign commerce…” The guidance proposes to substantially broaden EPA’s jurisdiction over water resources on private lands.

EPA was also petitioned in April to establish numeric water quality limits for nutrients in the Mississippi River and the Gulf Coast of Mexico.

Finally, the agriculture industry is suing the EPA to contest the agency’s novel, multi-state watershed pollution limit for nutrients and sediments in the Chesapeake Bay.

Although most of the above actions do not directly affect Kentucky woodland owners, the impending decisions may have broad implications for all private landowners.

New Report on Payment for Watershed Services (PWS)

From the USDA Office of Environmental Markets (OEM):
We’re pleased to share with you a new report produced by EcoAgriculture Partners with funding and support from OEM and the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities.  Innovations in Watershed-Based Conservation in the United States: Payments for Watershed Services for Agricultural and Forest Landowners surveys payments for watershed services (PWS) schemes to understand their current role in the U.S. and future potential for increasing cost-effective watershed protection on private lands.
Water is crucial for many human needs; yet water resources in the United States face serious threats from increasing pollution and overuse. PWS can address these challenges effectively as a complement to USDA conservation programs and other existing incentives. Under PWS programs, farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners can choose to provide watershed protection services—improvements to water quality or increases in water efficiency—and in return receive payments or other forms of compensation from the beneficiaries of these services. PWS can be more affordable than traditional engineering solutions while offering co-benefits including job creation, economic development, cleaner air, and open space.
In addition to the report, a map-based inventory of the identified PWS systems (http://www.conservationregistry.org/search/basic_search?search_term=pws) is available online through The Conservation Registry, a repository of conservation projects in the United States. The PWS inventory is a “living” database and can be updated regularly. Combined, the report and inventory are intended to help policymakers, landowners, conservationists, and water management professionals explore PWS opportunities in their areas.
Many thanks to EcoAgriculture Partners, the U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities, and the PWS practitioners who supported this project for their hard work!
USDA Office of Environmental Markets
http://www.usda.gov/oce/environmental_markets/index.htm

USDA promotes wood in green building rating systems

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack made a major announcement March 30th strongly promoting wood as a green building material and recognizing multiple green building rating systems. According to the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, the USDA announcement was made during the International Year of Forests celebration in Washington, DC. The event was co-hosted by the American Forest Foundation, the National Association of State Foresters, and the USDA Forest Service.

According to a March 30th USDA press release Secretary Vilsack laid out a three-part plan addressing the Forest Service’s and USDA’s current green building practices. The strategy includes the following parts:
1. The U.S. Forest Service will preferentially select wood in new building construction while maintaining its commitment to certified green building standards. USDA will also make a commitment to using wood and other agricultural products as it fulfills President Obama’s executive order on Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance.
2. The Secretary has asked the U.S. Forest Service to examine ways to increase its already strong commitment to green building by reporting to him on ways to enhance the research and development being done around green building materials.
3. The U.S. Forest Service will actively look for opportunities to demonstrate the innovative use of wood as a green building material for all new structures of 10,000 square feet or more using recognized green building standards such as LEED, Green Globes or the National Green Building Standard.
The plan explicitly recognizes the Green Globes standard and the National Green Building Standard, both of which recognize multiple forest certification standards. Opening the door to other green building rating systems increases opportunities for third party certified wood to be used and recognized in green buildings.
“This is just the market signal we need to expand markets for sustainably grown wood from ATFS,” said Tom Martin, President and CEO of the American Forest Foundation.

Estate Planning for Forest Landowners

Regardless of the number of acres, woodland owners need to make arrangements for their estates while they are living and while they are competent to do so. An extensive guide is now available from the US Forest Service specifically for family-owned forests.

Estate Planning for Forest Landowners:
What Will Become of Your Timberland?
2009. General Technical Report SRS-112
Available as a pdf download at http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/gtr/gtr_srs112.pdf

Although the report is more geared to large working timber holdings, its comparison examples of the impact of federal estate tax on family assets with and without estate planning are chilling. In the scenario (chapter 19) with no estate plan estate taxes could equal nearly one-eighth of the original estate. In the second example a simple plan leaving the estate to the surviving spouse avoids immediate estate tax. But the subsequent demise of that spouse could incur an estate tax equal to nearly one-fourth of the original combined estate. The final scenario presents three strategies that could reduce the example family estate tax bill by nearly $1.5 million compared to the simple plan. (These hypothetical examples are based on a family forest estate with assets valued at $10 million.)

The planning guide states that on the national level nearly three-fifths of all forest land is privately owned. More than four-fifths of that land belongs to nonindustrial owners. It also finds that the typical nonindustrial private forest owner is 60 years old. The importance of and urgency for timely forest estate planning should by now be evident. If you are still thinking it’s somebody else’s problem, complete the thirteen question “estate planning readiness” quiz on page 5 to better understand where you are in the process.

According to the book’s abstract, its purpose is to provide quidelines and assistance to nonindustrial private forest owners and the legal, tax, financial, insurance and forestry professionals who serve them on the application of estate planning techniques to forest properties. The book presents a working knowledge of the federal estate and gift tax law as of September 30, 2008.

Timber Theft: A Kentucky Overview

Timber theft is a common occurrence in Kentucky. Successful prosecution of perpetrators is not. Nina Cornett, KWOA member and long-time advocate for victims of timber theft, has graciously provided us with an outline of her extensive experience, research and interviews with timber theft victims and investigators. Cornett urges anyone who has had timber taken from their property to be fully aware of what they may face in the civil and criminal legal systems should they desire to prosecute. Cornett posits that successful prosecutions are rare and only changes in the laws addressing these thefts and an elevation of the importance of preventing and redressing these crimes will alleviate the problem.

For a full copy of Ms. Cornett’s research, please email her at Ngcornett@aol.com.

For a link to the University of Kentucky’s website regarding timber trespass go to www.ca.uky.edu/forestryextension/timbertrespass.php.

The KWOA winter newsletter will publish an article about a recent successfully prosecuted timber theft case. Stay tuned!

TIMBER THEFT – WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BE A VICTIM

“What’s all the fuss about a few trees?” (Purported statement by relative of logger indicted for stealing more than a hundred trees and suspected of stealing many more)

“The majority of timber theft occurs under what has been deemed a ‘culture of theft’ [emphasis added]. This [culture] is responsible for the belief that taking. . .trees here or there. . .has no real ‘harm’ but is necessary to allow the logger to ‘make a buck’. (GAP: Field Guide to Timber Theft)

“What murder case do you want me to stop working on to investigate your timber theft?” (Question by Sheriff to more than one victim)

“Why are you clogging up the courts with a civil case?” (Question by Commonwealth’s Attorney to Sheriff’s Deputy who investigated a timber theft and asked for a criminal prosecution)

“Go file a civil suit.” (Statement to a number of victims by legal authorities)

“Many times criminal acts are hidden under the cloak of civil remedy.” (GAP: Field Guide to Timber Theft)

“This won’t come to nothing. You know they [the victims] aren’t going to have the kind of money you need to get a survey and get a timber consultant. He [the logger] don’t have to worry.” [reported statement by relative of person suspected of timber theft.]

“I have heard through the rumor mill that________________ bragged that they had in fact stolen your timber. _________________________ has apparently said the same thing according to the sources, none of which are willing to give a statement to these comments”. (Prosecutor to victim of timber theft after a trial in which an accused timber thief got off)

“The reason people continue to steal timber is because they can.” (statement by timber theft victim)

TIMBER THEFT: WHAT A VICTIM NEEDS TO KNOW

A. Victims, Losses, and Victimization Methods
1. Victims.
1. Losses
2. Victimization Methods

B. Recourse
1. Criminal Law
2. State Civil Action
3. Federal Racketeering Statute

C. Obstacles:
1. “Boundary dispute”
2. “You’re not from here.”
3. “Clogging” the courts
4. Foot-dragging

D. Property rights

E. “Get-Even/Strike First” Warrant:
1. The “Keep off your own land” tactic.
2. The Fake charge
3. “Harassment without contact”
4. Countersuit for Defamation Threat

F. The “entry” fee
1. Survey costs
2. Timber Appraisal
3. Witness Fees
4. Legal Fees

G. The Loss Valuation problem
1. “Clean Water Act” limitation
2. “Can’t count in court” problem
3. “Garage” analogy

H. The “Legal” aspect
1. Finding a lawyer
2. Dealing with legal tactics; evidence gathering, etc
3. Bar Association Futility
4. Rights in court.
5. Be the Criminal

I. Trial Issues:
1. Delays
2. “Don’t get me involved.”
3. Reluctance to testify
4. “Let’s Settle It” issue

J. Incentivizing the Thief:
1. Ray’s case
2. Jeannette’s situation
3. “Undergoing chemotherapy”
4. Nobody goes after the “fence” or the transporter
5. Bad Actor” if pollute water, but not if steal.

K. What Other States Do

L. Where to from Here?

Family Estate Tax Deferral Act of 2010

Source: American Forest Foundation

In early August U.S. Senators Diane Feinstein (D-CA) and Mike Crapo (R-ID) introduced legislation in the Senate that would help to fix the estate tax for family forest owners and farms. S. 3664, The Family Estate Tax Deferral Act of 2010, will help preserve forest land by helping families avoid the pressure of selling to pay taxes when land is passed down from one generation to the next.

If the estate tax is not reformed before 2011, any estate worth over $1 million will be subject to a 55% tax. This will affect many landowners, and may force some of them to sell or harvest their timber unsustainably in order to pay the tax.

S. 3664, the Feinstein-Crapo bill, is similar to the Thompson bill, HR 5475, in the House. The bill would provide family forest owners with an exemption from the estate tax, if they keep the land in their family and manage it as a forest. Landowners can harvest, if they harvest consistent with a forest stewardship plan.

More information about the bill and contacting your senators is available from the American Forest Foundation.

Emerald ash borer quarantine specifics addressed

By Katie Pratt

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Jul 1, 2009)

Recently, the Kentucky Office of the State Entomologist, in consultation with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, issued a quarantine for 20 counties due to the emerald ash borer. Since the quarantine was issued, questions have arisen about the emerald ash borer, including controlling its spread and effects on ash trees.

The emerald ash borer attacks ash trees. Within several years, it can kill a tree. Thus far, the emerald ash borer has been collected at sites in seven Kentucky counties: Fayette, Franklin, Jessamine, Jefferson, Kenton, Campbell and Shelby. All of these counties are included in the quarantine along with neighboring counties or counties with a high number of ash trees: Boone, Bourbon, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Harrison, Henry, Oldham, Owen, Pendleton, Scott, Trimble and Woodford counties.

“The quarantine prevents the transportation of all hardwood species of firewood, ash trees, lumber, nursery stock or other material where the emerald ash borer is suspected into a non-quarantined area without a certificate or limited permit,” said John Obrycki, state entomologist and chair of the UK Department of Entomology.

Permits also are needed if ash wood products are transported from one state to another state that has quarantined areas. Untreated products in a quarantine area may be moved out of the area with a permit between October and March, which is the pest’s non-flight season. Wood materials moved within Kentucky’s quarantined area do not need a permit. No permit is needed on ash products and firewood moving into a quarantined area as long as they did not originate in a quarantined area in another state or were not transported through a quarantined area.

“The idea of the quarantine is to limit the movement of the pest,” said Carl Harper, UK senior nursery inspector.

To obtain a limited permit or certificate, individuals must have their wood products inspected by a member of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or the Office of the State Entomologist. To obtain a certificate or limited permit, contact the Office of the State Entomologist at 859-257-5838.

Individuals with ash trees should inspect their trees for the pest. The emerald ash borer is a small, metallic green bug. If the pest is present in a tree, it will leave pronounced D-shaped holes in the bark. If people see holes in the bark but are unsure if they were caused by the emerald ash borer, they may want to take a knife and smooth out the bark. The D-shape hole should become apparent.

A treatment to control emerald ash borers containing the chemical imidacloprid is available at most major garden centers; but it is expensive, so it may not be cost effective for an individual to treat infected ash trees.

Possible infestations should be reported to the Emerald Ash Borer Hotline at 1-866-322-4512 or the state entomologist’s office at 859-257-5838.

More information on emerald ash borer can be obtained at the National Emerald Ash Borer Web site at http://emeraldashborer.info, on the Kentucky Office of the State Entomologist Web site at http://www.uky.edu/Ag/NurseryInspection/, or on the UK Entomology emerald ash borer Web site at http://pest.ca.uky.edu/EXT/EAB/welcome.html