Category Archives: Policy

Government and Industry Policy Discussion

Petition to protect the Cedar Grove Wildlife Corridor

Louisville Gas and Electric (LG&E) requested an easement from Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest for the proposed Bullitt County Natural Gas Pipeline. Alternative routes exist that would not destroy conservation lands.

If you’re interested in getting involved, please consider signing a Petition to protect the Cedar Grove Wildlife Corridor. This Corridor is the section of Bernheim property that LG&Eequested easement and deed restrictions for.

Bernheim Under Threat Roadshows

Louisville Gas and Electric (LG&E) requested an easement from Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest for the proposed Bullitt County Natural Gas Pipeline. Alternative routes exist that would not destroy conservation lands.

Bernheim Under Threat Roadshows are dedicated to educating residents in nearby communities about the threats Bernheim faces and how the community can take immediate actions to save the forest.

To see the full list Bernheim Under Threat Roadshow, visit Bernheim’s website at https://bernheim.org/events/category/under-threat-roadshow/

Older trees remove more carbon from the atmosphere

Helping existing forests grow to their full potential is more beneficial than reforesting areas that were previously logged or growing trees in areas where there were none.

The research paper “Intact Forests in the United States: Proforestation Mitigates Climate Change and Serves the Greatest Good,” published in scientific journal Frontiers in Forests and Global Change on June 11, cites research that found “extending harvest cycles and reducing cutting on public lands had a larger effect than either afforestation or reforestation on increasing carbon stored in forests in the Northwest United States.”

Ongoing Work to Protect Bernheim Forest in Bullitt County

From the Kentucky Resources Council August newsletter

The defense of the Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest continues in Bullitt County. KRC’s Environmental and Community Defense team is gearing up its legal defense of Bernheim-owned tracts that are under a double-threat of taking by LG&E and of a future by-pass corridor. It is working alongside additional counsel to protect one of our state’s ecologically diverse  conservation corridors. The proposed pipeline threatens conservation efforts at Bernheim, and is the first known effort of a Kentucky electric utility to interfere with a conservation easement in order to locate an intrastate pipeline, and proposes to run gas service through the easement and across a number of private properties and waterways in order to serve populations other than those across whose property it will impact.

For more information about how this matter has unfolded…

Bernheim Under Threat Roadshow

Representatives from Bernheim will travel Bullitt County and the surrounding area to provide direct education on their current threat. Bernheim’s road show  and schedule is planned for several months.

Contact the Corps of Engineers and Fish & Wildlife

KRC is working hard to represent Bernheim in this ongoing issue, and your voice can make a difference, too. If you’re interested in getting involved, please consider contacting the Corps of Engineers and the Fish and Wildlife Service using the information below. As LG&E seeks approval for a pipeline corridor that its own consultant recommended avoiding, now is the time to demand that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers consider not merely the water crossings and wetland loss, but also the impacts on terrestrial rare and endangered species and public and private lands, and that the Corps demand an individual 404 permit application and a complete terrestrial and aquatic biological assessment along the chosen route, as well as full consideration of alternatives.

Contact

Louisville District of the Corps of Engineers
Louisville District Regulatory Division Office, South Branch
502-315-6675

Kentucky Field Station of the US Fish and Wildlife Service Office
502-695-0468 | kentuckyes@fws.org

Mapping microbial symbioses in forests

Data collected from over 1 million forest plots reveals patterns of where plant roots form symbiotic relationships with fungi and bacteria.

 

In and around the tangled roots of the forest floor, fungi and bacteria grow with trees, exchanging nutrients for carbon in a vast, global marketplace. A new effort to map the most abundant of these symbiotic relationships – involving more than 1.1 million forest sites and 28,000 tree species – has revealed factors that determine where different types of symbionts will flourish.

The work could help scientists understand how symbiotic partnerships structure the world’s forests and how they could be affected by a warming climate.

Stanford University researchers worked alongside a team of over 200 scientists to generate these maps, published May 15 in Nature.

The group used their map to predict how symbioses might change by 2070 if carbon emissions continue unabated. This scenario resulted in a 10 percent reduction in the biomass of tree species that associate with a type of fungi found primarily in cooler regions.

The data behind this map represents real trees from more than 70 countries and collaboration between hundreds of researchers who speak different languages, study different ecosystems and confront different challenges.

“There are more than 1.1 million forest plots in the dataset and every one of those was measured by a person on the ground. In many cases, as part of these measurements, they essentially gave the tree a hug,” said Brian Steidinger, a Stanford University researcher. “So much effort – hikes, sweat, ticks, long days – is in that map.”

Encouraging results in invasive species managment approaches

Removal of invasive shrubs has exceeded expectations for regeneration of native plants according to recent Penn State University research. Native shrubs that are mixed with invasive shrubs can recolonize on their own when invasives are removed. Read more…

Where eradication of invasive plants is not feasible, reducing their density and abundance to a level which allows native species to thrive through an integrated pest management approach is a viable alternative. Read more…

Stop deforestation and restore forests to solve biodiversity and climate change crises

Andrew Deutz from The Nature Conservancy regarding the new United Nations report on biodiversity:

One of the cheapest, most readily available and cost-effective things that we can do to both solve the biodiversity crisis and the climate crisis is, first, stop deforestation and, second, restore forests and then, third, change our agricultural practices to increase soil carbon and soil health.

Source: What Can Be Done To Prevent Mass Extinctions

May 12, 2019 on NPR Weekend Edition Sunday

State Foresters concerned about Administration’s desire to reduce funding for state and private forestry programs

March 19, 2019 press release from the National Association of State Foresters

The president’s budget request for FY20 “would eliminate or cut all but one Forest Service State and Private Forestry program and reduce investments in state and family forests to just 2.5 percent of the overall Forest Service budget,” said Lisa Allen, NASF president and Missouri state forester.

Per the president’s budget request for FY20, funding for the Forest Stewardship program, the Forest Health Management Program on Cooperative Lands, and the State and Volunteer Fire Assistance programs would be cut by a combined $29.65 million from FY19 enacted levels. Funding for the Landscape Scale Restoration, Forest Legacy, and Urban and Community Forestry programs would be eliminated.

Kentucky Forest Sector Economic Contribution Report Available

A recent analysis of Kentucky’s forest and wood industries indicated an estimated direct economic contribution of $8.5 billion and direct employment of over 26,000 Kentuckians in 2018. The total economic contribution was estimated at $13.5 billion with more than 60,000 jobs.

Kentucky remains one of the leading producers of hardwood forest products in the south and exports wood products across the nation and the world. The University of Kentucky Department of Forestry and Natural Resources has been documenting the Kentucky forest sector’s economic contribution since 2012.

 

To learn more about the economic contribution of Kentucky’s forest and wood industries …

 

Sustainable Forestry Initiative helps legacy of African American Landowners

Following the Civil War properties passed down by African American families became “heirs’ property,” and lacked clear title of ownership. This resulted in many heirs selling off their interest in the properties or failing to appropriately mange forestlands to reach their full potential.    Read more…

The Sustainable Forestry Initiative has partnered on projects in Virginia, North Carolina and Georgia to help reverse this trend by providing sustainable forestry education, access to timber market opportunities, and legal support.